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Biggest Airports in the World -

Biggest Airports in the World

These are definitely complicated years for the air transportation industry. If 2020 was the year of the pandemic with millions of people having to forgo travel because of Covid-19, 2022 is for all intents and purposes a complicated year because of the shortage of personnel. Indeed, in these two years of Covid-19 tens of millions of people have decided to move around the world from the tertiary sector-including tourism-to more stable sectors. There has been talk of Great Resignation.

That is, employees resigning to seek more stable contracts. In today’s article we will try to analyze the data on air transportation. What are the airports with the most traffic from 2000 to 2021? Which airports have the most passengers in the world?

Biggest Airports in the World 2021

But which airports in the world have the most passengers? The world’s top airport by number of passengers in 2021 is the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia. In total, the number of passengers passed through Harrsfiedl-Jackson Airport is more than 75.5 million in the whole year. Thanks to these numbers, the Atlanta airport grew by more than +76 percent compared to the previous year, 2020, where due to the covid-19 pandemic, air traffic had definitely decreased worldwide.

In second place among the airports with the highest number of passengers in 2021 is another airport in the United States. In 2021, the top seven positions are all occupied by U.S. airports. Dallas Fort Worth Internationa Airport is the second busiest airport in the world with more than 62 million passengers. Dallas Airport’s growth over 2019 is +58.7 percent. On the third step of the podium, however, is Denver International Airport in Denver, Colorado. In total, there were nearly 59 million passengers.

The top seven positions are all occupied by airports located in the United States. The first airport outside the U.S. by number of passengers in 2021 was Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport in China with more than 40 million passengers.

The strong restrictions in place in 2021 to contain the Covid-19 pandemic ledot this airport to decrease its passengers by -8% compared to 2020 – already a year of sharp decline. In ninth position, however, is Chengdu Shuangliu International Airportwith 40,117,494 pssengers. GThe first then positions also include the Indian airport: Indira Gandhi International Airport. The airport, located in Delhi, had a total of more than 37 million passengers and +30.3 percent growth in 2021.

Biggesr airport 2020

If we move the hands of time to 2020, the year where Covid-19 hit all the major countries in the world, we can see how the situation of airports was completely different. The most visited airport in 2020 was Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport with 43,767,558 passengers. This Chinese airport between 2019 and had a passenger drop of more than 40 percent. But losing many passengers were all airports. These included Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, which had a -61.2 percent drop in passengers in 2020. The collapse of the industry and travel in 2020 was definitely dramatic, and all major world airports were affected: from Asian to Latin American to European airports. The worst loss in percentage terms occurred in Thailand: the Suvarnabhumi Airport lost -74.5 percent of passengers. Frankfurt Airport in Germany lost 73.4 percent as did John F. Kennedy Airport in New York.

Sources and useful links

To watch the video of the Top 10 Richest People in the World 1999/2022: https://youtu.be/VW7lT9kgtZ4

To read: Top 15 Countries where People Work the Most Hours – 1870/2017: https://statisticsanddata.org/data/top-15-countries-where-people-work-the-most-hours-1870-2017/

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